Mission Possible

June 2, 2013 at The Muse Arts Warehouse

On June 2nd, 2013, R4LC hosted Mission Possible at The Muse Arts Warehouse. Within the R4LC the focus is on our children and ways to enrich their lives and enhance their opportunities for success.

Joshua Miller dances with his mother Muriel Miller Muriel Miller

Joshua Miller dances with his mother Muriel Miller, owner and dance instructor for Abeni Dance Studio.


Patricia McPherson and Ben Tucker

Patricia McPherson, who became a member of the R4LC 9 years ago with her grandson, sings Motherless Child, accompanied by jazz legend, bassist Ben Tucker.

Ben Tucker, an avid supporter of R4LC, recently passed away. Unfortunately, his last performance was at Mission Possible at The Muse. He was known for his love and concern for our youth. We salute his memory and his soul.


Jamari Tate

Jamari Tate, a classic speaker under the direction of Dee Lubell, gives wise counsel.


Dee Lubell

Mrs. Dee Lubell, with her students, the Coastal Youth Theatre of Voices from Brunswick, Georgia.


Mother Brewton

Front row wearing white hat; at 85 years young Mother Brewton is the senior member of the R4LC.


Terry Enoch

Retired prison administrator and the President of Savannah's 100 Black Men, Terry Enoch makes plain the vital importance of reaching our youth while we can.


Terry Enoch and Angela Lindsay

Terry Enoch shares that, in Savannah, more young black men receive their GED while in jail, than graduate from college.


Angela Lindsay

Angela Lindsay, creator of the R4LC, with volunteers, participants, parents and grandparents presented creative writing with music, spoken word, dance and comedy. Every song and every word become tools young people can use to empower themselves to face life and make smart decisions to increase options for success.


Karen Daniels

Karen Daniels, band teacher at Derenne Middle School, shared her amazing jazz talent on flute. Very nice!


Vee Butler

Vee Butler hosts the Mission Possible reception.


R4LC Poetry

This poem is written by a student who was being bullied by other students. Notice the difference in perspective and confidence between poem #3, written in 2003, and poem #68, written 2 years later in 2005. We also made this into a song on the CD.

Note: Grammar is as submitted.

What About Me? (Poem #3)

What about me?
Why can't I play with anyone?
I tried and tried,
but no one want to be my friend.
They don't want to play with me.
I been saying in my head,
But what about me?
Why can't I play with yall.

Why is I'm always left out.
What about me.
I don't have any friends at all.
What about me?
Why can't I play with yall.
Why is I'm always left out?
What about me?

A New Song: Believe in Your Heart and Mine (Poem #68)

You got to believe that you can do what you want to do.
Believe in your heart. Believe in your mine.
You do those things,
You can be what you want to be.
You do those things,
You can do what you want to do.
Believe in your heart. Believe in your mind.
Everyone always say that I need to believe
In my heart and believe in my mine.
So that why I'm tell you to
Believe in your heart, believe in your mine.
Believe, believe, believe in your heart.
Believe in your mine.